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plunging into the level of debt and deficit spending that has been taking place here over the past several years. eventually we're going to reach that tipping point. when we reach that tip point, investors and consumer lose conference. and when that happens, interest rates right. and when interest rates rise, it impacts our economy in a very significantly negative way. all we have to do is look across the atlantic at europe and what's happening there to get a glimpse of the crisis that can come from not dealing with ever-increasing debt and not taking steps necessary over a period of time to put your country on a fiscal path to health. now, i think most of us know here that we have to make some tough choices and it's going to require political will in order for us to address this. we've been avoiding this for years. expoo we're going to face a debt-induced catastrophe if we don't address it and drean addrt soon. so when you're faced with this kind of fiscal mess, what do you do? well, what families and pise businesses all across america have had to do when they face these types of situatio
and corporations. yet my friends on the other side my friends continue pushing this approach in the name of deficit reduction, but their own leadership admitted we don't have a debt crisis in the country. the architect, congressman paul ryan, said we don't have a debt crisis. speaker boehner said it's not an immediate problem. why should we enact this budget while democrats have a balanced approach to protect the middle class. why should we pass a budget that gets 66% of its cuts from programs for people of low or moderate income. why should we pass a budget that cuts pell grants that helps students or cuts the snap program that helps to feed 48 million people to give a $200,000 tax cut to millionaires? the budget put forward by the congressional black caucus continues the snap program to prevent americans from going hungry. while at the same time, reducing the deficit by $2.8 trillion over 10 years. the american people know we can't cut our way to prosperity, nor can we succeed by pursuing the same failed policies that undermine our economic recovery. the congressional black caucus budget offers a
and leave a nearly $6 trillion hole in the deficit that would lead to tax increases for middle-income families. that isn't balance. that is total imbalance. at the same time, republicans propose cutting $3.3 trillion from programs for people with low and moderate incomes, including hundreds of billions of dollars for food nutrition and medicaid programs. so i want to end by asking the republicans when they come and talk about their tax proposals to name a specific that they would address. it's not in the republican budget. name one, name two, name three. otherwise, it's worse than empty. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: with that, mr. chairman, i yield three members to the gentleman from indiana, r. rokita. mr. rokita: i thank chairman ryan in bringing this budget to the floor. i rise in high support of it. i also am very proud, one of the highest honors i have had in my short time here to serve on this committee. not because of chairman ryan only, but because of the members. by members, i mean republican and democrat mem
the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. so, mr. president, we have a few more hours of debate this morning between now and 11:00, followed by some votes, and then we will close out debate and move on to all the rest of the votes that we will take before final passage sometime late tonight or early tomorrow morning. i ask the senate -- as the senate majority leader said, we have hundreds of amendments filed. if we were to vote on every one of them, we would be here voting every single hour all the way through monday or tuesday. i know most members know that's not going to happen. so i would really encourage every member of the senate to work with the manager on their side to let us know which amendments are your priority so we can get them up sooner rather than later and vote on the ones that you want us to. so i urge all of our colleagues to work with us and our staffs and with ranking member sessions and his staff to make sure we know what your priorities are, how you would like to proceed, and w
budget. they now claim their budget would eliminate the deficit in 2023. and house budget committee chairman paul ryan has even said that it doesn't really matter how their budget eliminates the deficit. mr. president, americans across our country who will feel the impact of the choices we make in the coming weeks and months feel that it does matter. so while some of my republican colleagues would probably prefer not to hear about it, i think that the impact of the house republican budget is a crucial part of this debate, and we owe it to the american people to put our opinions on the record. now we've come a long way, mr. president, but there are still far too many americans today who are unemployed or underemployed, which is why our senate budget's first priority is boosting our economic recovery. speaker boehner has actually agreed with president obama that our debt does not present -- quote -- "an immediate crisis." so you might think the house budget would phase in cuts responsibly so we can protect our fragile recovery. well, instead the house republican budget would do seriou
that america does have a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is, the vast majority of our debt problems relate to the costs of health care in america. now that the debate over obama care is over, we should start thinking about how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out, two new works, a book and a magazine cover story provide some very useful ways to think about it. the central debate between democrats and republicans is over whether the free market works well in health care. in a new book, catastrophic care, david goldhill makes the case for the market arguing that people need to become consumers of health care so that they, not insurance companies, not the government, actually see, feel and pay the bills. that will force producers of health care, doctors and hospitals, to push down prices and drive up quality. that's what happens with groceries and television sets and computers. lasiks surgery which is not covered by health insurance, has seen a 90% drop in price and increase in quality since it was introduced in the 1990s. that
a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is that the vast majority of our problem is related to the cost of health care in america. now the debate over obama care is over, we should start to think seriously of how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out a book and magazine story provide ways to think of this. the central debate between republicans and democrats is over whether the free market works well in health care. in a new book catastrophic care, they make the case arguing people need ito become consumers of health care so they, not insurance companies or the government, actually see, feel and pay the bill. that will force producers of health care, doctors and hospitals to push down prices and drive up quality. that's what happens with groceries, tv sets or computers. and basic surgery has seen a 90% drop in price and increase in quality since it was introduced in the '90s. that's what happens when consumers pay for a product. steven makes the opposite case in a recover story in "time" magazine. he painstakingly went th
's this job that has seen the deficit come down by a third since he became chancellor. and private sector jobs. he's cutting the country out of a whole we were left in by the party opposite. [cheering and applause] [inaudible] >> the prime minister welcome. the country's first local enterprise fund people who care have raised 400,000 pounds to invest in businesses and encouraging enterprise securing employment and in so many others where they lead the rest of the country -- [inaudible] i'm sure my friend is right about that the leadership of all things. he makes an important point, need to see more small businesses start, more enterprise. we need to see more to keep the private sector going. >> alex cunningham. >> rising unemployment remains an issue in my constituency. based on the reemployment and recession which claims hard working families in the most vulnerable for the obscene tax for millionaires. [cheering and applause] -- looks at the figures today he'll see there are 131,000 more people in work over the last quarter, we have seen 600,000 more people employed compared with a year ago,
problems. we've now cut the deficit not by a quarter, but by a third. we've helped business create not a million new jobs, but one and a quarter million new jobs. we've kept interest rates at record lows. but mr. deputy speaker, despite the progress we've made, there's much more to do. today, i'm going to level with people about the difficult economic circumstances we still face and the hard decisions required to deal with them. it is taking longer than anyone hoped, but we must hold to the right track. and by setting free the aspirations of the nation, we will get there. our economic plan combines monetary activism with fiscal responsibility and supply side reform. and today we go further on all three components of that plan: monetary, fiscal, and supply side reform. but we also understand something else more fundamental. our nation is in a global race competing alongside new centres of enterprise around the world for investment and jobs that can move anywhere. building a modern reformed state to drivefford. businesses overseas with taxes getting more and more uncompetitive. .o le
to get anything going and that's the way to deal with the deficits, of course. and there were some measures there. no national insurance payments for employees for the first few thousand pounds reducing corporation tax earlier to 20%. infrastructure spending, could it be more? businesses would always want more. but there was acknowledgement he tried while keeping the next fiscally neutral. on the whole, businesses say, not bad, could have done more. i think that will be the summation for them. the key factor, of course, is if you're not going to do more to stimulate your own growth, what happens to the eurozone becomes even more important. and i did speak to the chancellor, george osborne, just a short while ago and i asked him how worried is he about what's going on in cypress? this is what he had to say. >> it is a worrying situation in cypress and i think there's been some sole rans in international markets and elsewhere that they've got to sort these problems out. but obviously, we now need a solution. if i would have concerns if these depositors, less than a hundred thousand e
deficits with no end in sight doesn't lead to prosperity, doesn't lead to growth. it leads to financial ruin. i'm also the father of four great kids, two in college and two in high school. they know that as a family they have to plan ahead for the future. we need to create a budget and then live within our means. these are the same principles that my parents past down to me. -- passed down to me. these are the values that montana's families live by each and every day. those values are exemplified in montana's own state legislature. we're the only constitutionally -- where the only constitutionally required duletty is passing a budget. in -- duty is passing a budget. in fact, when they adjourn in a little over a montana, they will have given montana a balanced budget, just like they did last year and the year before and the year before that. it seems simple -- live within your means, spend no more than you take in, but it's not so easy here in washington. right now we are presented with two very different visions for our country, two visions that will lead to two very different outcomes
deficit by almost $6 trillion in 10 years. reduce ay budget would little under $2 trillion in 10 years. >> what other groups are offering their own budget plan docks water they likely to focus on? >> -- who will be issuing their own budget plans? budget will be similar to patty murray's budget in the senate. increases,ave tax but neither would balance the budget in 10 years. also the congressional black caucus and the congressional progressive caucus will be introducing budget. it's possible a ryan version could be introduced in the senate. >> what is likely to happen in the senate this week? >> it will be democrats making the case for the patty murray budget. convince someto democratic senators who may not support that budget. they will have to sell it to democratic senators as well as republicans. no republicans are likely to vote for the budget. they will be calling for more spending cuts, no tax increases, balancing the budget sooner. >> republicans say this to be the first time in four years they have agreed to put forward a plan. why is this your difference? are a number of diffe
to reduce the deficit. unfortunately, rather than seriously considering the credible path that we have presented in our budget plan, some republicans have decided to play some games with the numbers, and they just are not telling the truth. instead of subtracting the sequestration replacement portion in the investment package from the $975 billion in total revenue, they're trying to say that you should somehow add them all together. they are taking one side of the ledger, combining it with the other side of the ledger and coming to some conclusion that makes absolutely no sense to us. mr. president, this would be like handing over $2 to buy a cup of coffee and having someone say, well the price was actually $2 plus the value of that coffee. it doesn't make any sense. and, by the way, you don't have to take my word for it. fact checkers and reporters have called this claim false and a step too far. and "the washington post" fact correcter even gave it two pinocchios. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent to insert in the record a story from "the washington post" on this inaccurate clai
and bennett, the head of this new party on the right. it's unclear to me, i think you have a knowledge deficit that you didn't have the last time around. when you had someone with barak's experience, begin's experience, all these guys are gone. and the question is, does that mean the wheels, the brakes have come off the train? and that now it's more of a runaway car? or are you saying, no, not at all. livni might be there, and there'll be people who might not have the same amount of years of experience, but are maybe counterpoints to some of the other forces. so what's unclear to me yet is to what extent that forum that netanyahu relied upon, how central is that going to be? what is going to mean the loss of that knowledge, that deficit of experience? but i do think for the key factor, he definitely sees that his goal is that israel just be a normal western country, that the middle class have a better quality of life. sounds very familiar to people here. but he has said that the road to that is dealing with palestinian issue. not dividing jerusalem, but everything else. we've got to work this
, and the senate thinks shouldsome revenue should be idea to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not just simply cut tax rates for the rich. >> usually you can tax more and spend more and borrow more and that will somehow create growth and prosperity. i believe we have had four years of that experiment, which i fundamentally doubted and opposed from the beginning. and it hasn't worked. >> shepard: regardless of whether it's worked or hasn't, the insiders say the democratic budget will likely pass. mike emanuel is in washington. how has the vote been going and what's it like in there so far? reporter: we expect starting any moment they'll vote on a series of amendments between now and late night tonight. 25 to 40. summon hot-button issues including abortion, school choice, and bailouts. there are also arguments on budgetary matters. >> anyone wants to be taxed more than is necessary on either side of the aisle, but this enormous, enormous hubbub from the other side that says it's got a spending problem but refuses to look at the other side of the balance sheet, as a business guy,
right now. then we address the long term budget deficit in a balanced way where we ask for shared responsibility as opposed to the republican plan which provides another tax break wind fall to very wealthy people at the end of everybody else. the expense of the middle class, the expense of commitments to seniors. so our focus right now is to number one, do no harm to the economy. number two, invest in a jobs plan that will help put people back to work. whether building roads or bridges or infrastructure or other things important to our economy. >> why will it take until 2040 to balance the budget under your plan? >> well, if you actually look at the past 40 years, we've only had four balanced budgets. those were during the clinton years and once leaning over to the bush years and then they squandered that balance. so the reason we do that is our focus is on jobs, craig. our focus is on meeting our commitments to seniors. we will not balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education or on the backs of our commitments to seniors. whether it is under medicare or medicaid. what w
's a financial transsanction, the with tax and getting return it helps with the deficit. the second help to buy hasn't been seen before in the country. whep families whoment to mortgage for any home they are buying but cannot begin to afford the deposit. we offer a new mortgage guarantee. helping them to provide more mortgages to people who can't afford a big deposit. the guaranteed mortgages available to homeowners subject to the usual check on responsible lending. using the government balance sheet we will dramatically increase their availability. we have worked with some of the biggest mortgage lenders to get it right. and we're offering guarantees to support 130 billion pounds worth much mortgages. and will be available from the start of 2014 and run for three years and a future government need the -- policy committee if they want to extend it. help tow buy is a dramatic intervention to get the housing market moving for enoughly built housing. government will put up a fifth of the cost. and anyone affording a mortgage but not a big dpe deposit. it will help you buy your own home. in the buc
. we shouldn't run a deficit at least one that is as large now. i think it's precarious and for the senators, democratic senators running for reelection in red states. that is why you saw four democratic senators they are all representing states that barack obama lost. >> gregg: speaking of debt and deficits, president obama said recently the debt is not an immediate problem, but by huge margins, americans disagree. 68% of them disagree with the president on that. they also think he is wrong with b something else. spending. this is a fox news poll. they think his top priority should be cutting spending to reduce the deficit, not spend more, taxpayer dollars to create jobs. is that why president obama seemed to have dropped the campaign for spending realize he is pushing his job ratings down and in the process driving away potential voters? >> i think there has been a sense over the last month or so, as you point out poll numbers have gone down. white house is not going to make a big campaigns go across the country asking for tax increases but that is also because they ar
account deficits, we're not shipping as much joe seas? >> when people think of the economic situations, they think of the u.s. but what it will do, it will cut into the u.s. deficit and it will cut into the chinese surplus. and you ask the average economist for the last three or four years before the crisis, during the crisis, after the crisis, what's the global economic problem, number one, the answer probably isn't microimbalances. trade surplus in the u.s., trade surplus and china. what i didn't know is that still more than half of the u.s. deficit of goods and services is energy imports. >> and that's going to go away? >> as things are going, that might be going away. at the same time, china surplus will suffer from the tracing of independence of china. >> that's strong dollar weak yuan. becky. >> just an observation. >> first, tight oil, i haven't heard of this before. i know where the marcellus shale fields are. where is tight oil? is it in the same sort of locations? >> same. traditionally, coming out of gas yields because of this huge different between gas and oil prices. which
that the republicans are a little bit too root canal, a little bit too debt-obsessed, a little bit too deficit-obsessed and don't talk about the economy and jobs, which polls still show are the number-one issue. >> yeah, they've got to go back to reagan and jack kemp to stop acting like consequence at this pated accountants and get focused on what makes this economy grow. and the way you get revenues, not by raising taxes, by growth. if we had normal growth rates, we would get another 4 or 500 billion right off the bat. that's what they should focus on. all a means to an end. on social security, stop coming across that you're going to, you know, do something to grandma and instead talk about the idea, which they haven't, they don't touch it, of having accounts for young people with proper controls where they own the fruits of their labor, not washington politicians. make it positive instead of this -- as you say, root canal, that was more graphic. >> i think that -- i don't want to get -- i want to talk about the corporate tax, but i want to add to this, i think in a sense obama was right. and
up by the fed money printing. our deficit is as well as it makings it cheaper for poll tish shuns to borrow. former representative ron paul says why the fed is addicted to the this. you don't want to miss ron paul coming up. lauren: despite the cyprus scare, our next guest says they offer good investments. he will tell you which ones to buy. his answers certainly surprised me. lauren: time for a quick speed read of some of the day's other headlines. five stories, one minute of the first up, general motors recalling 34,000 vehicles to fix transmissions. recall affects 2013 buick lacrosse and cadillac srx crossover models. >>> u.s. crude oil production set to pass imports for the first time in 18 years. the gap between monthly oil production and imports is projected to be nearly two million barrels per day by 2014. >>> neiman marcus settles with the federal trade commission after claiming its products were made with faux fur when they contained real fur. it prohibits the retailer from violating those laws for 20 years. >>> total number of mortgage applications subpoena applied for i
the reason why there isn't any wiggle room, because one, cutting the deficit, democrats propose cutting it $1.85 trillion, half through spending cuts and half through tax hikes. the republican plan, paul ryan plan, would cut the deficit $4.6 trillion in ten years and includes repealing obamacare. the hope going through the legislative process they might be able to find compromise to strike some sort of deal. >> we need to put americans back to work. that's our first priority. deficit reduction i would put as the second priority and one that is coupled with economic growth the so i think we can do both. make sure we have deficit reduction but don't cut too much too fast. >> reporter: bottom line, bill, american people are seeing this over and over again. republicans and democrats fighting on both sides of the aisle and perhaps, they can come together for a grand bargain but just doesn't appear to be the case right now. as they grapple with the budget, keep in mind that two weeks away they have to come up with a continuing resolution by march 27. bill: as ryan says, at least there is baseline f
trillion in debt. we have deficits we can't even wrap our arms around, and they want more of your money. if you were a financial advisor that put you $1 million in debt and ripped through your college savings for your children and all of your checking account and said, just give me more money and we'll solve the problem, would you do it? absolutely not. more than jobs, though, we are also working to save medicare and social security, the commitments that we have made to the american people. so let's take a look here at the big picture. here's a budget breakdown of where we are at right now. look, your eyes are glazed over and we start talking about the trillions of dollars that we spend, but let's take a look at what you pay versus what you expect. this big blue part right here? that's on auto pilot. no adults have come to the table to talk about where we are at today and how to actually save your social security and medicare and medicaid in this big blue part. we are doing that today. house republicans in balancing the budget. but this is what you expect from the federal government. yo
in deficit reduction. there's plenty of room to cut more. and plenty of room to raise revenue and that's part of any big package. >> you heard senator corker, lay ought, if they give this, we'll give this as well. entitlements is what he's saying on the democratic side. what would you be open to? >> i'd be open to reducing costs in medicare. i think the affordable care act made a good down payment that way in reducing payments to medicare advantage plans. we can reduce overpayments to pharmaceuticals. and we can put costs by focusing on making sure the services are deliverable rather than paying for the number of services. there are ways to bring down costs without attacking the benefits under medicare. social security, a little more difficult. i think many of us would support raising the lid at which payroll taxes are paid into the system. that would help preserve social security for another generation. so there are changes democrats have been willing to embrace to reduce costs to raise revenues to support those programs. but we need a willing partner on the other side. and in the house we d
about deficit reduction that it is a misplaced focus, that the real priority should be on job creation. but it seems that too many people in congress who just think the most important thing is to cut cut cut. so is the deficit really the most thant thing? is the deficit out of control, or is job korea payings more important? >> chris van hollen is right. we have over 40 million american families living in poverty. these numbers carry with them a really human toll. so if we want to be looking at the long-term success of the u.s. economy, then balancing the budget in the short term is a really short-term mistake. >> bill: in other words the best thing we could do to grow the economy is put people back to work. >> yes, and make the sorts of investments that will get people to work today, take a look at pre-k. you are not only employing a lot more full-time teachers but at the same time you are investing in future workers. >> bill: how can it be that you have got -- again, the dough -- these new record highs, corporate profits record high financial institutions are back
. it never balances. never comes close to balancing. it claims that it reduces the deficit over 10 years by $1.5 trillion. that is not correct. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonderhat other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. bill: there's a top republican senator now demanding answers from the fbi director after not being briefed on their benghazi investigation for the last six months. four americans died in the assault on the u.s. consulate including our ambassador chris stevens. senator susan collins says she wants some simple questions answered. quote, are any of the suspects believed to be responsible for the deaths of these four americans including ambassador stevens in u.s. or libyan custody? how many suspects in the attacks are still at large? a few other questions after that. virginia republican congressman frank wolf has been fighting for answers in benghazi. he is our guest now. sir, good morning,
that trying dollars deficit can quickly spin out of control because interest rates growth and people don't want to borrow going to get. if interest rates go up, the united states is even worse here the deficit will go up even more. what is already in the current situation will spin out of control very easily like we've seen happen in greece and other countries. that want to talk about the impact of obama's views on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much th
not have sex with that woman. president obama setd this will not add a single dime to the deficit. >> look, it's going to bring down health care costs. it's amazing people hate so much something that has barely taken effect. most hasn't gone into effect. the american people when asked about the specific provisions in the affordable care act like it. they like tax credits for small businesses to pay for insurance, they like cling the medicare donut hole, they like kids staying on insurance. 80% of people like those and less than 50% know they are in the bill. so stop smearing the bill to tell people wh's really in it. >> talk about why this didn't kick in. we had to wait until it got voted back in. they wrote this so that once he's in all the crabby stuff comes out. stuff we're two years in nobody has a clue what a state exchange is, nobody knows what is going to happen to medicare. good luck trying to find a doctor or nurse in the next couple years. they waited until the guy got back independent office and bam. >> you buy the number sally threw out that 80% of the people are okay with this
the budget because the president and treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? at the exact same time, the fed tightened rates, doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily if the fed stayed easy, which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable if the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress have repeated the errors of 1937 down to a tee. he can't let the fed's part in the drama be repeated. otherwise he'd go down as the fed chief who never got the economy going and put it back in a recession, a
dollar deficits, no growth, which is true, and we keep having these states with higher taxes and destroying output, it could happen here. it terrifies me. >> what would trigger it would be sharply higher interest rates when people -- in order to buy our debt. not talking about just a few points here but dramatically higher interest rates where it's impossible for us to pay our entire debt load. then becomes a point where we reach financial collapse. >> neil: when people don't trust their financial institution. but when it's your bank bank, your passbook savings account, that is called into question, that galvanizes. then what? >> here's the thing, neil. that almost happened in the past and i think hank paulsen and bernanke and the leadership -- recappallizing the banks was the way to go. in these countries, the banking system is the government. they're so intertwined. we're not there but we're getting there. and remember, once the government -- once they're questions about the sovereign -- sanctity of the dollar, everything falls because our banking system is aligned with our
class. at least we have a budget now and at least democrats now can show that deficit reduction can be done responsible. responsibly. >> the lack of a bunt has been an effective talking point for republicans. why do you think they haven't reached an agreement? >> because they're democrats. they have a hard time reaching an agreement about anything. that's why they're democrats. the progressive caucus shows that it is possible to reduce the budget deficit by taking even more away from big corporations reducing corporate welfare to an even larger extent reigning in tax loopholes, and so-called tax expenditures. the democratic budget and senate budget is a very good place to begin. i think the progressive caucus's budget is much better. >> analysts are saying this budget is to the left of obama. many on the left would say we should have expected that. does this give the president the opportunity to bring people together and get some sort of grand bargain by throwing things less liked under the bus. >> there is not going to be a grand bargain. the right wing controls the republican part
is not in there. too much deficit reduction, 16%. slow job growth, 12%. too little deficit reduction, 10%. guys, these are more normal problems, i would say, than we've had in the past. the european financial crisis, u.s. financial crisis. sue, i would take a victory, yes, there are problems out there. >> i totally agree with you. it's the first time in a long time we haven't seen europe on a list like that. >> thank you, steve. >> absolutely. thanks, steve. >> sure. >> the markets here are a little lower, not all that much, though, given what we've had in headline risk this morning. dow jones industrial is down 38 points and s&p is off about 9. bob pisani is here to tell us what is going on. there's a lot of headline risk in the market today. >> and we're back moving on europe now. >> exactly. given 38 to the downside is not that bad. >> even europe is not reacting that much. let me show you the euro. everyone goes crazy talking about the euro. perhaps the finance minister may be resigning, we're trying to confirm that for sure. that's what we've been hearing. and on words that the governing b
, immigration and guns and what to do about the deficit. >> don't forget two other prominent spokes people, the president and vice president. they care a lot about it and have been quiet of late. i expect to see a big push between of two of them before the vote. >> the lack of courage in the united states is asstountounast. >> it's amazing. >> no one is coming to take your gun. no one is coming to take your gun. >> it's amazing. it's amazing. when you look at the fact that we are talking about a simple thing like background checks. people are dying every day. a baby killed in -- >> in pennsylvania. >> in brunswick, georgia. we are arguing about background checks is almost ununbelievable. surreal. >> background checks have 90% of support among the american people last check. >>> senator bob casey of pennsylvania will join us on the set coming up and leigh gallagher and representative rick mulvaney will weigh in. our good friend michael hainey will have a preview of the "gq" magazine. bill karins, what is up? >> schoolhouse are cancelled around baltimore and washington, d.c. a lot of delays.
's deficits were unpatriotic and a fraction of what these are. and 2009 cut the deficit in half he the end of the first term and that was essentially ignored in 2012 when he ran for reelection and failed to do that and mentioned one time in the newscast in one year. and 2012 told msnbc taking care of the deficit being the first order of business, this week, or last week, he said no and you're not going to get a balanced budget for the the sake of balance and sustainable for the next ten years. i think he's clearly moving the goal post, a watch dog press would be all over this, but seem to be ignoring this. you should see the e-mails, our viewers are all over it. rich, thank you. tax the rich not playing well overseas or at home for that matter. listen to this. >> in france, the approval rating of the socialist president hollande has plummeted to a mere 31%. remember, hollande came to office proposing a huge tax on the rich. here, bill maher of all people are turning against high taxes. yes, bill maher. complaining about how high his taxes are, would you know it. the man who gave a million
, you've heard about the fracking but further into that, i think that the trade deficit for the u.s., two to three years from now is going to go from deficit to surplus. we haven't had a surplus since 1975. secondly, global trade, global trade is actually very good for the u.s. because it grows the global economy. for instance, there's a new panama canal that is going to really bowler is it the south belt trade from china to other emerging markets. technology is always, we're looking in the technology, there is something called big beta. this is taking technology from cost controls to revenue enhancement. we coined our own pivot. per re, indsmeesh that, vietnam, oman and turkey. tracy: what worries you the most right now? >> europe. i'm very concerned that cyprus is not by itself a big deal but they keep changing the rules of the game and the financial system is very precarious right now in europe. the u.s. is fine. and i'm just wondering how long can europe, we're in the third, they're in the third recession in five years, how long can they not grow? all the debt forgiveness in t
you need to deal with it budgets and deficits and you need to keep growth going. here is what i saw over the weekend. recession in greece which is a actually a depression if you line it up against the u.s. great depression in 1929 it looks a lot a like in terms of how much unemployment there send a how much the economy was contracted. greece is having our great depression of the late 1920s. >> wow. >>> moving on to washington now. president obama's renewed push for a grand bargain may be showing some early signs of paying off, at least with one top republican. senator bob corker of tennessee says he could envision raising tax revenue if democrats embrace big changes to medicare and social security. he is at odds with other members of his party including house speaker john boehner who is ruling out the prospect of any new taxes. >> i think, by the way, there is a chance on a deal. i know the president is saying the right things and we have an opportunity over the next four to five months. i think republicans, if they saw true entitlement reform would be glad to look at tax reform tha
who are being affected by that. you know, the best way we can deal with our debt and deficit long term is to grow the economy and that's what this budget does. it recognizes we need to invest long term. we need to cut spending and it does that. it does not do that. >> we need to invest long term. >> senator, with all due respect and i month your point of view may i just add after $650 billion tax hike already this year you raising taxes at least another trillion, i don't know how that is pro growth. regarding the sequester, i can understand making some changes to the sequester with regard to the management of the subaccounts particular in the defense department but you're not doing that. you're spending most of that money. associated press reports often years there may be a couple hundred billion dollars of spending cuts but the sequester was 1.2 trillion. you are in effect raising spending and raises taxes are you not? >> the budget closes a lot of corporate loopholes where we've been paying for people who go overseas and create jobs rather than paying to create jobs here at home. i d
the president a major deficit reduction victory or not? if they really believe that needs to be done and the president put something on the table that gets them significant entitlement reform and savings, i think they've got to do it. >> harold, i think the possibility of deals and immigration, possibility of deals on guns, possibility of deals on the budget, on the long-term debt, i think the possibilities are actually -- excuse me for being optimistic, pretty darn good on all fronts. you've got republicans who daily are holding press conferences wringing their hands trying to figure out how to save their party. and you have a president who, again, he's a 47%, pretty damn good considering everything. but still, he wants to be over 50% and he wants a legacy. he doesn't want to just talk about what he did the first two years. >> i agree. i believe the prospects for progress on both immigration and gun control are gun regulation. if we get progress on the budget and the debt. i think immigration and gun regulations are easier to win. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong,
it in for the dunk to cut the deficit to one. st. louis was just too much. cody ellis drains the three to give st. louis a six-point lead. they go on to win 62-56. so st. louis plan to watch the ncaa selection at the airport but they ran into traffic so they settled for watching it at a best buy in new jersey. look, it comes with comedy la-z-boys. don't expect to see defending champion kentucky, they were left out of the big dance. we start in the midwest where louisville claim the top 87 all seed in the tournament. should they win they'll face the winner of the colorado state versus missouri game. in the west, gonzaga got the number one seed but they've got a tough road. they would face the winner of the pitt versus wichita state game in the second round. on the other side of the bracket kansas took the top seed in the south but they have a date with either unc or villanova should they advance to the round of 32. in the east, indiana starts as the top seed. it's second seed miami that has a lot of people talking. they'll face pacific in the opening round. then vegas likes louisville to take the
there? you can go and beat hair cut there. but they are running deficits of $350,000 a year. time to privatize? >> kimberly: time to supercuts. >> dana: speaking of that, we did a google search. if you let the senators know it would not be the end of the world if you had to give up the senate barbershop. look on the map. there are seven places in walking distance from the capitol to get your hair cut. >> kimberly: now give them coupons to go over there. and give it to the barber and start it up. c'mon, i pay less to get my hair done. >> dana: time to privatize the senate barbershop? >> greg: i don't know. look at the success the barbershops have had. good job, guys. >> eric: you got your hair cut? >> greg: they fell asleep at the wheel. i use the great acres analogy. obama's democrats are like the sexy zaza that could expense every vehicle they have. eddie arnold is the guy that always has to play the bills. we have zsa zsa gabor in the white house. it's great because in a sense they're our mother so they tell us thousand use the microwave. might be at night they give us a bedtime
of the american people, including the majority of self-identified republicans that we can move forward on deficit reduction in a balanced way. >> bret: senior political analyst brit hume in miami tonight with thoughts on the charm offensive. good evening, you look sun-shiney in miami. >> life is good here, bret. you should come. i hope you will be here soon. >> bret:ly indeed. what do you think of the charm offensive? >> well, it was a remarkably sudden conversion by the president from an attitude of, you know, up yours. i don't need you, to i want to get together to talk with all of you. of course, the leaders in the, the republican leaders in congress who are smart enough not to act skeptical about it. they said they thought it was fine and good. more the better. but i think in the end, you have to ask a question, bret. simply this. is it likely that president obama will make any major concessions on the entitlement programs, without more new taxes? and the other side of that, of course, will republicans be willing to go along with more new taxes to get reform in entitlement programs. unless yo
we go deficit reduction. you saw minutes 6-3. there was expectation we had noises out from tucker that perhaps there might have been a bigger number voting for qe. what we will look at today is to see what osbourne does with the bank of england and there's a bunch of things he might do from amending the target, inflation target to changing the bank of england act saying we'll put in a jewel mandate. that may be more of a focus than anything he says about borrowing figures and growth numbers. >> absolutely. you can look at the sterling reaction here, ross. we're spiking above 151 now on the back of those minutes. melanie, over to you. i guess investors would have liked to see hints of a more accommodative bank of england here during the last meeting. might there not be more of a policy shift under way perhaps as ross said related to even changing the mandate? >> in terms of what we're expecting today, we do think that it might be the more interesting of the budget to watch. i wouldn't expect any big changes today. i think what he may do is announce a review of the policy fra framew
, that's the estimate of what the possible deficits of these programs might be projected out to the infinite future. it's known as the infinite horizon projection. it doesn't tell us anything about the current fiscal status of these programs. it's just designed to create a big scary number as it does. 60 trillion-dollar, sometimes you hear the number 200 trillion-dollar. that's nonsense. real actuaries hate this sort of number because they say it's only there to basically mislead the public, and to scare people into making changes in these programs that they don't need, and that aren't necessary. >> john: indeed. i know we're short on time but i want to get to your fourth lie which i thought was one we hear all the time that you're paying way too much for your benefits or maybe you're paying too little? >> yes this is an in the misrepresentation. they are social programs. some putting more in to them will get more out of them. some won't get much out of them, what they paid in taxes. what makes the programs valuable at the middle of your career or midpoint of your career you
the deficit, more stimulus and spending. we are in the funny process where we will wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. any issue you have heard your callers call in and complain --ut, we might see today drone strikes against u.s. citizens, taxes, repealing healthcare -- they might all come up, but it is adding to a nonbinding budget resolution, so it is interesting and it might give people clues. host: a headline in your sayscation, "the hill," the senate is poised to pass a budget. guest: i think democrats will control the process and get it passed. .hey have a small window they can afford five democrats to not vote for it and still pass it, and in that case you would need vice president joe biden to break the time. -- the thai. .- tie there is pent-up frustration on the republican side about no real budget debate over four years. once it is passed, a lot of people will feel better. democrats will say we passed a budget, republicans get to complain about the budget month but from there it is hard to see how the senate budget reconciles with the house bu
taxes, it would curb spending by repealing obama care and eliminate the deficit in ten years. $4.6 trillion in cuts. zero chance of passing in the democratic-controlled senate, it's dead on arrival. >> lawmakers in the house and senate approved legislation to fund the government through the end of september. that avoids the risk of a partial federal shutdown. in the process, they are on spring break for a couple weeks. what's your take on this? >> my take is the whole financial dysfunction of our congress is mind blow iing. you look at this week. let's say frederick, maryland, where there's air traffic control that will be shut. a tower that was built by the stimulus money. so stimulus money went into this tower. the government saying it's a priority. and the the government because of its dysfunction saying we have to shut is down. that's a perfect representation, i think, of how washington is not doing its job. we can't even pass a budget. it can't even run the books. there's no strategy. when you look at some of the spending cuts, you see a lack of a strategy in american financ
and the government would still be in a deficit ten years from now. senator patty murray, however, argues it creates jobs and economic growth for the democrats, the vote is a big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we've done 101. average, we've done 70, twice as many. to doing this has been a herculean feat. >> hundreds of amendments were filed, but 70 were voted on. senators approved a sales tax for online retail sales and voted to approve tkeystone pipeline and to big to fail for big banks. and these are mostly symbolic gestures and show where the senators stand on issues and of course, when you take a 13 hour 6 minute vote there does have to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as of this time, 5 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. (laughter) . >> reporter: all democrats voted yea with exception four who are up for reelection in 2014 and states which can be unfriendly to democrats and white house secretary responding to today's news and saying the p
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